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Posts Tagged ‘Corruption’

Yesterday the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois brought out its 22-count indictment of Michael (“I’m not the target of anything”) Madigan.

In July 2020, the U.S. Attorney’s Office entered into a Deferred Prosecution Agreement with Exelon Corp. and Commonwealth Edison Company, which served as Madigan’s political patronage machine for close to a decade. The DPA refers to Madigan as “Public Official A,” and includes messages from people in his corrupt network that refer to Madigan as “Himself” or “Our Friend.” It seems like Madigan was more popular among the federal prosecutors than he thought. In exchange for bribes to or for the benefit of Madigan, ComEd and Exelon ensured the passage of legislation favorable to them, and hindered or prevented legislation Exelon didn’t like.

If we could delve into the inner recesses of Madigan’s mind, we’d find that his Id, Ego, and Superego are all composed of one thing: a driving ambition to be the Second Coming of Richard J Daley. Madigan’s father and Daley the Elder became friends when both held political patronage jobs in the Cook County Clerk’s Office. Using political patronage, Daley the Elder went on to build one of the most powerful political machines that any American city had ever seen. During old Mayor Daley’s tenure, parts of Chicago’s government, like the Department of Streets and Sanitation, were turned into political patronage machines that Richard J. Daley used to provide jobs for his supporters.

One of old Mayor Daley’s chief precepts, which Madigan was later to adopt as his guiding principle, was to help your friends and either punish or co-opt your enemies. To Madigan, Daley the Elder had achieved what he considered political Nirvana: a world in which everybody both depended on you and was afraid of you.

But Old Man Daley passed away in 1976, and in 1983 the Shakman Decree ended Chicago city government’s role as a perpetual patronage machine.

Madigan’s alternative was to use ComEd and Exelon as a way to create a new political patronage machine and do an end run around the Shakman Decree. For Exelon and ComEd it was a match made in, well, maybe not heaven. As the DPA showed, bribery and corruption are integral components of Exelon’s business model: the utility parasite and the political parasite established a symbiotic relationship.

Over the next few weeks we’ll go further into the specific chapter and verse of the legislative benefits that Exelon and ComEd obtained at the expense of Illinois ratepayers. Nothing in the 22-count Madigan indictment revises the amount of bribes that Madigan directly or indirectly received: about $1.3 Million. We’ll tally up the economic benefits that Exelon and ComEd obtained from these illegal payments, and see how they balance out.

But Madigan and the Illinois legislature comprise just one sphere of influence. We’ll also take a look at how Madigan’s malignant principles have metastasized throughout the Illinois courts — an area the U.S. Attorney’s Office might be interested in. The General Assembly and the Illinois courts are the two poles between which the Madigan supremacy oscillated for nearly a half century. Within the courts Madigan’s fingerprints are harder to see, but it must be borne in mind that, whether Madigan was acting at one or the other of these poles, it was the Madigan supremacy still. His control was absolute and coordinate.

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